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NEWS: The Huntington Announces Year-Long Centennial Celebration!

The Huntington’s Centennial year opens in September 2019 with “Nineteen Nineteen,” a major exhibition in the MaryLou and George Boone Gallery that draws from the library, art, and botanical collections to examine that historic year across the globe and the founding of The Huntington in the context of international events. 
portrait gallery (c) The Huntington
In October 2019, “What Now: Collecting for the Library” opens in the Library’s West Hall, the first exhibition of a two-part series highlighting a wide variety of recent acquisitions of rare books and manuscripts. 

Also opening in the fall of 2019 is the fourth installment of The Huntington’s /five initiative, a collaboration in which contemporary artists respond to a theme drawn from The Huntington’s collections, culminating in an exhibition.

Throughout the celebration year, The Huntington will offer a special series of programs that look at the collections in new ways and explore their potential impact into the future. The Huntington’s audiences will have the opportunity to experience Centennial-oriented content through a dedicated website inviting visitors to share their memories and impressions of The Huntington through text and images. New displays in the Mapel Orientation Gallery are planned as well.

“During our Centennial celebration, we want to engage people in The Huntington as an unparalleled repository of our history and, at the same time, as a site of increasing relevance to the way we think, create, and live our lives today. It may seem that our botanical gardens are the only organic parts of our collections, but in fact, our library and art collections are organic as well, growing and changing their physical and interpretive shape. With ‘Nineteen Nineteen,’ our curators have the chance to identify objects from across the library, art, and botanical collections to tell fascinating stories about intellectual, aesthetic, and natural history, and suggest new directions for thought. Why did Henry Huntington, a wealthy industrialist, collect rare books, manuscripts, and fine art? Why did he develop among the first avocado orchards and desert gardens in Southern California? We believe it is because the arts, humanities, and the natural world added both pleasure and meaning to his existence. The Huntington is a wondrous enterprise that never ceases to delight its visitors in the same existential way.” - Lawrence

Details about all The Huntington’s Centennial celebration exhibitions and programming will unfurl over the coming year.

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